Today on ridiculous arguments be moffat stans: “Canton Delaware was good representation because you didn’t know he was gay!”

macklemorologist:

moffat: um im not homophobic i have a gay friend

alez-on-mars:

So, as long as Moffat is in charge, we won’t: get:

The Master
Jack Harkness
Rose and Tentoo
Good representation
Actual character development
Coherent plots and story arcs.

But we’ll get dinosaurs.
Misproportioned random dinosaurs.

Yeah, clearly the show is getting more adult and mature :D

woozapooza:

serenify13:

theconfessionsofawhovian:

http://theconfessionsofawhovian.tumblr.com/

Posing hypothetical situations and then blaming hypothetical people for their hypothetical reactions proves nothing.
There’s a difference between forgiving (like Martha forgiving the Doctor for the year that never was because it wasn’t his fault but still leaving to help her family recover) and acting like it never happened (like Amy continuing to travel with the Doctor after he kept her pregnancy from her then put her back in her real body just as she was going into labor after explaining nothing about they’re situation, River being left to break her wrist on her own [and she quite literally tries to act like it never happened], and Clara instantly jumping out of the TARDIS after the Doctor had just left her without her permission [which then results in him leaving her again, which she “forgives” again, although the Doctor shows no real remorse]).
You can have two characters go through similar problems with similar end results, but depending on how well the characters are written and how the narrative frames them, they can have depth or ring completely hollow. It’s up to the writer.

Moffat’s defenders sure do use a lot of false equivalencies, don’t they? “Why is it okay for Ten to kiss Martha, but not for Eleven to kiss Jenny?” “Why is it okay for Davies to kill off the Time Lords, but not for Moffat to bring them back?” “Why is it okay for Rose not to want to live without the Doctor, but not River?” “Why is it okay for Eleven to say that Jabe fancied him, but not for Ten to say that Martha fancied him?” And now, “Why is it okay for Martha to forgive, but not for Amy and Clara to bounce back from being hurt?”
If the post OP is referring to is the one I’m thinking of, it gave four examples of Martha extending kindness to people who had mistreated her:
1. In Gridlock, she wishes luck to Milo and Cheen, who had kidnapped her. She had been furious at first, pointing a gun at them and demanding they let her go. In the hours the three of them spent together on the motorway, Martha learned that Milo and Cheen were just desperate to get a better life for themselves and their baby, regretted having to kidnap her, and intended to let her go as soon as possible. We see her go from angry to sympathetic as she sees into their minds and realizes they’re not bad people.
2. In The Family of Blood, she offers to check on Joan, who had made condescending, racist comments to her. While I do suspect that Martha had sympathy for Joan, having seen Joan come alive emotionally as she dealt with losing John, this is mainly for the benefit of the Doctor, who’s torn up at having to leave Joan without John Smith. Even though both Joan and John treated Martha badly, she can sense that the Doctor is upset and her response is to try to fix it, because she’s a doctor.
3. In The Last of the Time Lords, she brings flowers to Professor Docherty, who had sold her out to the Master. The fact that Martha knew it was going to happen surely made it easier to forgive, but also, Martha knows why Professor Docherty did it: her son’s life was in danger. Martha understands her point of view.
4. In The Doctor’s Daughter, she fixes the bone of the Hath who kidnapped her. It’s not threatening her at that moment, and she’s a doctor and fixing people is what she does. She’s wise enough to know that just because she’s the enemy in the war the Hath is fighting doesn’t mean it’s bad or that it has it in for her personally.
The post mentions the Doctor as a footnote. Unlike in the examples the gifset gave, in the whole deal with the Master, the Doctor didn’t intentionally do anything that would hurt Martha or her family. Still, it would be understandable if she had some bitterness for him. But we know she doesn’t, because she tells Donna that she doesn’t believe any of it was his fault. Martha is wise and she’s good at being objective. She’s good at seeing other people’s points of view, and she has empathy for everyone. So she has no bitterness for the Doctor.
I’m drawing some conclusions here that we don’t get explicitly because it’s a show and not a book. But given the pattern of Martha forgiving characters who hurt her without malice, we can draw conclusions about her character. We see Martha being hurt and we see her actively forgiving and fixing things. We see tons of instances of her kindness and compassion that aren’t in the context of forgiveness. It’s a well-established character trait. The thing is, she stands up for herself tons too. She fights against Milo, Cheen, and the Hath, she makes the classic “bones of the hand” speech to Joan, she’s in control in The Last of the Time Lords and stands up epically to both the Master and the Doctor. She combines self-respect with magnanimity. That makes her strong and it makes her three-dimensional. It’s not at all the same as Clara’s anger at the Doctor for sending her away lasting like three seconds, or Amy not being very bothered by the whole ganger thing and the fact that the Doctor is slacking on finding her daughter.

woozapooza:

serenify13:

theconfessionsofawhovian:

http://theconfessionsofawhovian.tumblr.com/

  1. Posing hypothetical situations and then blaming hypothetical people for their hypothetical reactions proves nothing.
  2. There’s a difference between forgiving (like Martha forgiving the Doctor for the year that never was because it wasn’t his fault but still leaving to help her family recover) and acting like it never happened (like Amy continuing to travel with the Doctor after he kept her pregnancy from her then put her back in her real body just as she was going into labor after explaining nothing about they’re situation, River being left to break her wrist on her own [and she quite literally tries to act like it never happened], and Clara instantly jumping out of the TARDIS after the Doctor had just left her without her permission [which then results in him leaving her again, which she “forgives” again, although the Doctor shows no real remorse]).
  3. You can have two characters go through similar problems with similar end results, but depending on how well the characters are written and how the narrative frames them, they can have depth or ring completely hollow. It’s up to the writer.

Moffat’s defenders sure do use a lot of false equivalencies, don’t they? “Why is it okay for Ten to kiss Martha, but not for Eleven to kiss Jenny?” “Why is it okay for Davies to kill off the Time Lords, but not for Moffat to bring them back?” “Why is it okay for Rose not to want to live without the Doctor, but not River?” “Why is it okay for Eleven to say that Jabe fancied him, but not for Ten to say that Martha fancied him?” And now, “Why is it okay for Martha to forgive, but not for Amy and Clara to bounce back from being hurt?”

If the post OP is referring to is the one I’m thinking of, it gave four examples of Martha extending kindness to people who had mistreated her:

1. In Gridlock, she wishes luck to Milo and Cheen, who had kidnapped her. She had been furious at first, pointing a gun at them and demanding they let her go. In the hours the three of them spent together on the motorway, Martha learned that Milo and Cheen were just desperate to get a better life for themselves and their baby, regretted having to kidnap her, and intended to let her go as soon as possible. We see her go from angry to sympathetic as she sees into their minds and realizes they’re not bad people.

2. In The Family of Blood, she offers to check on Joan, who had made condescending, racist comments to her. While I do suspect that Martha had sympathy for Joan, having seen Joan come alive emotionally as she dealt with losing John, this is mainly for the benefit of the Doctor, who’s torn up at having to leave Joan without John Smith. Even though both Joan and John treated Martha badly, she can sense that the Doctor is upset and her response is to try to fix it, because she’s a doctor.

3. In The Last of the Time Lords, she brings flowers to Professor Docherty, who had sold her out to the Master. The fact that Martha knew it was going to happen surely made it easier to forgive, but also, Martha knows why Professor Docherty did it: her son’s life was in danger. Martha understands her point of view.

4. In The Doctor’s Daughter, she fixes the bone of the Hath who kidnapped her. It’s not threatening her at that moment, and she’s a doctor and fixing people is what she does. She’s wise enough to know that just because she’s the enemy in the war the Hath is fighting doesn’t mean it’s bad or that it has it in for her personally.

The post mentions the Doctor as a footnote. Unlike in the examples the gifset gave, in the whole deal with the Master, the Doctor didn’t intentionally do anything that would hurt Martha or her family. Still, it would be understandable if she had some bitterness for him. But we know she doesn’t, because she tells Donna that she doesn’t believe any of it was his fault. Martha is wise and she’s good at being objective. She’s good at seeing other people’s points of view, and she has empathy for everyone. So she has no bitterness for the Doctor.

I’m drawing some conclusions here that we don’t get explicitly because it’s a show and not a book. But given the pattern of Martha forgiving characters who hurt her without malice, we can draw conclusions about her character. We see Martha being hurt and we see her actively forgiving and fixing things. We see tons of instances of her kindness and compassion that aren’t in the context of forgiveness. It’s a well-established character trait. The thing is, she stands up for herself tons too. She fights against Milo, Cheen, and the Hath, she makes the classic “bones of the hand” speech to Joan, she’s in control in The Last of the Time Lords and stands up epically to both the Master and the Doctor. She combines self-respect with magnanimity. That makes her strong and it makes her three-dimensional. It’s not at all the same as Clara’s anger at the Doctor for sending her away lasting like three seconds, or Amy not being very bothered by the whole ganger thing and the fact that the Doctor is slacking on finding her daughter.

thehalfbloodboner:

reblog if you love tumblr for its on point moffat critique

penguintim:

(In response to the oversized T. Rex in Deep Breath)
I remember a while ago I saw a quote from Moffat that was something along the lines of “I give historical episodes to the other writers so that I don’t have to do research”, and while that was probably a joke on his part, it’s clear that he obviously cares more about writing things that look cool than things that conform to basic logic.

littlelupin:

laughinghieroglyphic:

Whoa. The MLA has officially devised a standard format to cite tweets in an academic paper. Sign of the times.

Payne, Liam. (@Real_Liam_Payne). “Gott in yeaterday spilt a fulllllllllllll! Tub of pasta on the floor, stupid stupidd stupidddddd boy smelly pasta house” 14 Oct 2012, 4:24 AM. Tweet.

littlelupin:

laughinghieroglyphic:

Whoa. The MLA has officially devised a standard format to cite tweets in an academic paper. Sign of the times.

Payne, Liam. (@Real_Liam_Payne). “Gott in yeaterday spilt a fulllllllllllll! Tub of pasta on the floor, stupid stupidd stupidddddd boy smelly pasta house” 14 Oct 2012, 4:24 AM. Tweet.

tsubomihanasaki:

just dont call trans women ugly i dont understand why its hard to get that

Anonymous / Have you heard about Peter Capaldi refusing to act a romantic relationship with Clara? Do you think he'll do well, or be smothered by Moffat?

raptorific:

From what I’ve gathered, Peter Capaldi is a huge fan of Doctor Who that pretended to be a huge Moffat stan until he’d signed an airtight contract, at which point he revealed he hates the direction Moffat was taking the show he loves, plans to systematically undo it to the best of his ability, has been openly mocking and refusing the participate in parts of the script he doesn’t think are true to the character, and insisting that they “won’t chase him off this show,” which is basically saying “this town ain’t big enough for the both of us.”

I think the new season of Doctor Who is going to be glorious.

thepurplekoala:

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It’s funny how people think that saying that RTD was problematic excuses the problematic parts of Moffat’s writing.